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©2019 by Dakotah Sausage Stuffer          585-531-4132       dakotahstuffer@yahoo.com      www.dakotahsausagestuffer.com

Hot Pork Sausage - Sweet Italian Sausage - Kielbasa Sausage - Smoked Hot Links - Salami - Venison Hot Dogs - Slimm Jimmy Sticks - Honey Barbecue Jerky - Peppered Deer Jerky - Beef Brisket Bacon - German Bologna - See Sausage And Jerky Makers' Bible Book

Select Recipes from the Sausage And Jerky Makers' Bible Book

Making Your First Batch

When you begin to put together your first batch of sausage using this book, it’s important to stick to the recipe formula. Upon the completion of your first batch, you may think the sausage is terrific as is, or possibly there’s too much fennel seed, or not enough red pepper. It could happen, because my idea of an Italian sausage might not be what you had in mind, a problem easily remedied by personalizing the recipe formula. It’s simple enough to alter ingredients in an effort to appease your flavor requirements, but I wouldn’t suggest it until after you have completed your first batch of sausage and have a better understanding of how the sausage making process works.

Adding more or less  of a particular spice will change the flavor of your sausage without causing too much damage to the end product, in fact, the change could enhance the flavor. Using too little or too much table salt, on the other hand, has the potential to ruin the sausage. No salt at all produces a bland, unappetizing product, just as too much salt will produce a product that is so salty that a starving dog isn’t likely to get past the first bite or two! Be careful if you decide to alter the amount of salt in any given recipe.

Hot Pork Sausage

Pork sausage is a favorite breakfast indulgence made from coarsely ground pork butt and seasoned with salt, sage, thyme and in this case a healthy dose of crushed red pepper flakes to kick up the heat. Hot pork sausage is great in sausage gravy over biscuits, in omelets, or fried crispy and served with over-easy eggs and rye toast.

5 lbs.                                                            25 lbs.

4 1/2 lbs pork butt (2.1 kg)                          22 1/2 lbs pork butt (10.2 kg)

1/2 lb pork back fat (227 g)                         2 1/2 lbs pork back fat (1.13 kg)

2 1/2 tbsp table salt (54.8 g)                       3/4 cup table salt (274 g)

1/2 tsp coriander, ground (0.85 g)              2 1/2 tsp coriander, ground (4.25 g)

1 1/4 tsp nutmeg (2.5 g)                              2 tbsp nutmeg (12.5 g)

1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (3.3 g)                2 1/2 tbsp cayenne pepper (16.5 g)

1 1/2 tsp ground black pepper (3.75 g)      2 1/2 tbsp ground black pepper (18.8 g)

1 1/2 tbsp powdered dextrose (13 g)         1/2 cup powdered dextrose (65.3 g)

2 tbsp rubbed sage (7.8 g)                          2/3 cup rubbed sage (39 g)

1/2 cup ice cold water (118 ml)                   2 1/2 cups ice cold water (590 ml)

22-24mm prepared sheep casings

1.  Chill pork/fat to 34°F (1°C), grind one time through a 3/16” (5mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground pork/fat with remaining ingredients; mix/knead well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Do a taste test by cooking a small thin patty, cool patty briefly prior to tasting.
4.  Stuff the seasoned sausage batter into prepared 22-24mm sheep casings; twist into 4” (10.2 cm) links.
5.  To use bulk style, stuff meat batter into poly meat bags or shape the batter mixture into equal size patties.
6.  Pan fry, grill, broil or bake fresh sausage at medium heat until it’s brown on the outside and no longer pink inside.*
7.  Refrigerate up to 5 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.

Hunters may use venison in place of the pork butt for this recipe. Use 75-80% lean venison trim to 25-20% pork fat.

*The USDA suggests cooking fresh sausage to an internal temperature of 160°F (70°C) when checked with a quick-read thermometer. It takes about 10 seconds for the temperature to be accurately displayed with this unit.

Sweet Italian Sausage

To the uninformed, a product that bears the name of “sweet Italian sausage” would seem to imply that it has a sugary sweetness about it, when in fact, nothing could be further from the truth. Generally speaking, there is no sugar added; it’s simply a term used by sausage makers to differentiate between mild Italian and hot Italian sausage.

5 lbs,                                                               25 lbs.
4 1/2 lbs pork butt (2.1 kg)                             22 1/2 lbs pork butt (10.2 kg)
1/2 lb pork back fat (227 g)                            2 1/2 lbs pork back fat (1.13 kg)
2 1/2 tbsp table salt (54.8 g)                          3/4 cup table salt (274 g)
1/2 tsp coriander, ground (0.85 g)                 2 1/2 tsp coriander, ground (4.25 g)
1 1/2 tsp granulated sugar (7.35 g)                2 1/2 tbsp granulated sugar (36.8 g)
2 1/2 tsp coarse black pepper (6.5 g)            1/4 cup coarse black pepper (32.5 g)
1 1/2 tbsp fennel seed, cracked (16.2 g)       1/2 cup fennel seed, cracked (81 g)
1 1/2 tbsp paprika (10.8 g)                             1/2 cup paprika (54 g)
1/2 cup ice cold water (118 ml)                      2 1/2 cups ice cold water (590 ml)
32-35mm prepared hog casings

1.  Chill pork/fat to 34°F (1°C), grind one time through a 3/16” (5mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground pork/fat with remaining ingredients; mix/knead well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Do a taste test by cooking a small thin patty, cool patty briefly prior to tasting.
4.  Stuff the seasoned sausage batter into prepared 32-35mm hog casings; twist into 5-6” (13-15 cm) links.
5.  To use bulk style, stuff meat batter into poly meat bags or shape the batter mixture into equal size patties.
6.  Pan fry, grill, broil or bake fresh sausage at medium heat until it’s brown on the outside and no longer pink inside.*
7.  Refrigerate up to 5 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.
     
Delicious as it is versatile, sweet Italian sausage can be grilled over charcoal and served atop a hard roll smothered with sautéed onions and bell peppers or served as a breakfast sausage with a side of eggs and hash browns.

Hunters may use venison in place of the pork butt to produce an outstanding sweet Italian sausage. Use 75-80% lean venison trim to 25-20% pork fat.

*The USDA suggests cooking fresh sausage to an internal temperature of 160°F (70°C) when checked with a quick-read thermometer. It takes about 10 seconds for the temperature to be accurately displayed with this unit.

Kielbasa Sausage

Kielbasa is synonymous with smoked Polish sausage and extremely popular in the eastern United States. It’s typically made from ground pork and seasoned with garlic, marjoram, salt and pepper, then stuffed into natural casings.

5 lbs.                                                               25 lbs.

2 1/2 lbs beef chuck (1.13 kg)                        12 1/2 lbs beef chuck (5.67 kg)
2 1/2 lbs fatty pork butt (1.13 kg)                   12 1/2 lbs fatty pork butt (5.67 kg)
2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.7 g)                      3/4 cup pickling salt (244 g)
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)                      5 tsp Prague Powder #1 (28.5 g)
3/4 tsp coriander, ground (1.28 g)                 1 1/4 tbsp coriander, ground (6.4 g)
1 1/2 tsp garlic powder (4.65 g)                     2 1/2 tbsp garlic powder (23.1 g)
1 1/2 tsp coarse black pepper (3.9 g)            2 1/2 tbsp coarse black pepper (19.5 g)
1 1/2 tbsp mustard seed, whole (19.8 g)        1/2 cup mustard seed, whole (99 g)
2 tbsp corn syrup solids (27.6 g)                    2/3 cup corn syrup solids (138 g)
1/2 cup non-fat dry milk (47.3 g)*                  2 1/2 cups non-fat dry milk (237 g)*
1/2 cup ice cold water (118 ml)                      2 1/2 cups ice cold water (590 ml)
35-38mm prepared hog casings

1.  Chill beef/pork to 34°F (1°C), grind one time through a 1/4” (6mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground beef/pork with remaining ingredients; mix well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Stuff freshly mixed batter into hog casings and tie off into 18” (46 cm) sausage rings, refrigerate overnight to cure.
4.  Next day, hang kielbasa in preheated 130°F (54°C) smoker with dampers wide open; hold for one hour.
5.  Add chips, close vents, gradually raise smoker temp to 170°F (77°C). Hold until sausage is 152°F (67°C) internally.*
6.  Remove 152°F (67°C) links from smoker; shower with cold water until internal temperature drops to 110°F (43°C).
7.  Hang kielbasa at room temperature for 1 hour to bloom.
8.  Refrigerate up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.

Reduce the cooking time by removing the product from the smokehouse when it reaches an internal temperature of 120°F (49°C). Submerge in a 170°F (77°C) hot water bath until the internal temperature of the product is 152°F (67°C).   Do not allow the water to get hotter than 170°F (77°C).   

Hunters may use venison in place of the beef and pork to produce kielbasa. For the best results, use 75-80% lean venison trim to 25-20% beef fat.
        
*The USDA suggests that the internal temperature of smoked sausage reach 160°F (70°C)  when checked with a quick-read digital thermometer.

*You may use soy-protein concentrate in place of non-fat dry milk.

Smoked Hot Links

Hot links derive their distinctive fiery taste from a mix of cayenne and red pepper flakes. These spicy  sausages are meant to be grilled and served on a toasted bun with mayonnaise and brown mustard, but  you can slice the links into coin-size pieces and add to your favorite soups and stews––it’s a great sausage no matter how you eat it.

5 lbs.                                                               25 lbs.

4 1/2 lbs pork butt (2.1 kg)                             22 1/2 lbs pork butt (10.2 kg)
1/2 lb beef fat (227 g)                                     2 1/2 lbs beef fat (1.13 kg)
2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.7 g)                      3/4 cup pickling salt (244 g)
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)                      5 tsp Prague Powder #1 (28.5 g)
1 1/2 tsp garlic powder (4.65 g)                     2 1/2 tbsp garlic powder (23.1 g)
1 1/2 tsp onion powder (5.4 g)                       2 1/2 tbsp onion powder (27 g)
1 1/2 tbsp red pepper flakes (9.45 g)            1/2 cup red pepper flakes (47.3 g)
2 tbsp paprika (14.4 g)                                   2/3 cup paprika (72 g)
2 tbsp corn syrup solids (27.6 g)                    2/3 cup corn syrup solids (138 g)
1/2 cup non-fat dry milk (47.3 g)*                  2 1/2 cups non-fat dry milk (237 g)*
1/2 cup ice cold water (118 ml)                      2 1/2 cups ice cold water (590 ml)
32-35mm prepared hog casings

1.  Chill pork/fat to 34°F (1°C), grind one time through a 3/16” (5mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground pork/fat with remaining ingredients; mix well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Stuff freshly mixed batter into hog casings; twist into 5-6” (13-15 cm) links. Refrigerate overnight to cure.
4.  Next day, hang sausage links in a preheated 130°F (54°C) smoker with dampers wide open; hold for one hour.
5.  Add wood chips, close vents, gradually raise temp to 170°F (77°C). Hold till internal temp of links is 152°F (67°C).*
6.  After links reach 152°F (67°C), remove from smoker, shower with cold water till internal temp drops to 110°F (43°C).
7.  Hang hot links at room temperature for 1 hour to bloom.
8.  Refrigerate up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.


You can reduce the cooking time by removing the links from the smokehouse when they reach an internal temp of 120°F (49°C). Submerge in a 170°F (77°C) hot water bath until the internal temperature of the links are 152°F (67°C).   Do not allow the water bath to get hotter than 170°F (77°C).   
        
Hunters may use venison in place of the pork butt to produce first-rate hot links. For the best results, use 75-80% lean venison trim to 25-20% beef fat.

*The USDA suggests that the internal temperature of smoked sausage reach 160°F (70°C) when checked with a quick-read digital thermometer.

*You may use soy-protein concentrate in place of non-fat dry milk.

Salami, Smoked

This salami is a lightly smoked, mildly spicy sausage, made from coarsely chopped beef and pork and flavored with cracked black pepper, cardamom and garlic. More in line with American tastes and easy to make at home.

5 lbs.                                                               25 lbs.

4 1/2 lbs beef chuck (2.1 kg)                          22 1/2 lbs beef chuck (10.2 kg)
1/2 lb fresh beef fat (227 g)                            2 1/2 lbs fresh beef fat (1.13 kg)
2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.7 g)                      3/4 cup pickling salt (244 g)
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)                      5 tsp Prague Powder #1 (28.5 g)
1 tsp cardamom (2.8 g)                                  5 tsp cardamom (14 g)
1 tsp liquid smoke, optional (5 ml)                5 tsp liquid smoke, optional (25 ml)
1 1/2 tsp garlic powder (4.65 g)                     2 1/2 tbsp garlic powder (23.1 g)
1 tbsp paprika (7.2 g)                                     1/3 cup paprika (36 g)
2 tbsp corn syrup solids (27.6 g)                    2/3 cup corn syrup solids (138 g)
3 1/4 tbsp cracked black pepper (32 g)         1 cup cracked black pepper (160 g)
1 cup non-fat dry milk (94.6 g)*                      5 cups non-fat dry milk (473 g)*
1 cup ice cold water (236 ml)                          5 cups ice cold water (1.1 L)
3 1/2” (90mm) fibrous casing 

1.  Chill beef/fat to 34°F (1°C), grind one time through a 1/4” (6mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground beef/fat with remaining ingredients; mix well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Stuff freshly mixed batter into fibrous casings (cut into lengths to fit your smoker), refrigerate overnight to cure.
4.  Next day, hang salami chubs in a preheated 130°F (54°C) smoker with dampers wide open; hold for one hour.

5.  Add wood chips, close vents, gradually raise temp to 170°F (77°C). Hold till internal temp of chubs is 152°F (67°C).*

6.  Remove 152°F (67°C) chubs from smoker, shower with cold water until internal temp drops to 110°F (43°C).
7.  Hang salami chubs at room temperature for 1 hour to bloom.
8.  Refrigerate salami up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.


You may reduce the cooking time by removing the salami chubs from the smokehouse when they reach an internal temperature of 120°F (49°C). Submerge in a 170°F (77°C) hot water bath until the internal temperature of the chubs are 152°F (67°C).   Do not allow the water bath to get hotter than 170°F (77°C).   

Hunters may use venison in place of beef to make smoked salami. Use 80-85% lean venison trim to 15-20% beef fat.

*The USDA suggests that the internal temperature of smoked sausage reach 160°F (70°C) when checked with a quick-read digital thermometer.

*You may use soy-protein concentrate in place of non-fat dry milk.

Venison Hot Dogs (Skinless)

Online is your best source for cellulose casings but once you find them, the rest is easy enough. Start by weighing out the correct amount of meat and fat, grind as directed, mix the freshly ground meat with the list of ingredients to form a sausage batter, stuff batter into the casing. Tie off cellulose casings as explained below.

5 lbs.                                                               25 lbs.

3 lbs lean venison trim (1.36 kg)                    15 lbs lean venison trim (6.80 kg)
1 lb pork butt (454 g)                                     5 lbs pork butt (2.27 kg)
1 lb fresh beef fat (454 g)                               5 lbs fresh beef fat (2.27 kg)
2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.7 g)                      3/4 cup pickling salt (244 g)
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)                      5 tsp Prague Powder #1 (28 .5 g)
1/2 tsp celery seed, ground (1.35 g)              2 1/2 tsp celery seed, ground (6.75 g)
1/2 tsp garlic powder (1.55 g)                        2 1/2 tsp garlic powder (7.75 g)
1 tsp mace, ground (2.6 g)                             5 tsp mace, ground (13 g)
1 tsp onion powder (3.6 g)                             5 tsp onion powder (18 g)
1 1/2 tbsp white pepper (12.2 g)                   1/2 cup white pepper (60.8 g)
2 1/2 tbsp paprika (18 g)                                3/4 cup paprika (90 g)
1/4 cup corn syrup solids (54.4 g)                  1 1/4 cups corn syrup solids (272 g)
1 cup non-fat dry milk (94.6 g)                       5 cups non-fat dry milk (473 g)
1 cup ice cold water (236 ml)                         5 cups ice cold water (1.1 L)
28-30mm cellulose casing

1.  Chill meat/fat to 30°F (-1°C), grind 2-3 times through a 1/8” (3mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground meat/fat with remaining ingredients; mix together well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Stuff the batter mixture into cellulose casing, twist into 5-6” (13-5 cm) links, tie off each link with a piece of cotton

     twine, refrigerate overnight to cure.
4.  Hang venison hot dogs  in preheated 130°F (54°C) smoker, dampers wide open; hold at this temperature for 1 hour

     or until casing is dry to the touch.
5.  Add wood chips, close vents, and gradually raise smoker temperature to 170°F (77°C). Hold until hots have an

     internal temperature of 152°F (67°C).*
6.  Upon reaching temperature, remove links from smoker and shower with cold water until the internal temperature of

     venison hots drop to 110°F (43°C).
7.  Hang venison hots at room temperature to cool then peel off casing.
8.  If the outside of the hot dogs are greasy, spray them briefly with hot water.
9.  Refrigerate hots up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.


You can reduce the cooking time by removing the salami chubs from the smokehouse when they reach an internal temperature of 120°F (49°C). Submerge in a 170°F (77°C) hot water bath until the internal temperature of the chubs are 152°F (67°C).   Do not allow the water bath to get hotter than 170°F (77°C).      

*The USDA recommends that the internal temperature of cooked sausage reach 160°F (70°C) when checked with a quick-read digital thermometer.

Slimm-Jimmy Stick

Bet you didn't know that the legendary “Slim Jim” was created in the basement of Adolph Levis during the Great Depression. I’m not claiming that the following recipe is going to produce the next great Slim Jim, but it has earned good reviews among the folks who were gracious enough to give it a try. Both kids and adults love these.

5 lbs.                                                               25 lbs.

4 1/2 lbs beef chuck (2.1 kg)                          22 1/2 lbs beef chuck (10.5 kg)
1/2 lb fresh beef fat (227 g)                            2 1/2 lbs fresh beef fat (1.13 kg)
2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.7 g)                      3/4 cup pickling salt (244 g)
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)                      5 tsp Prague Powder #1 (28.5 g)
1 tsp ginger powder (2.3)                               5 tsp ginger powder (11.5)
1 tsp celery seed, ground (2.7 g)                   5 tsp celery seed, ground (13.5 g)
1 tsp onion powder (3.6 g)                             5 tsp onion powder (18 g)
1 tsp liquid smoke, optional (5 ml)                5 tsp liquid smoke, optional (25 ml)
1 1/2 tsp dry mustard powder (3.45 g)           2 1/2 tbsp dry mustard powder (17.3 g)
1 1/2 tbsp ground black pepper (11.3 g)       1/2 cup ground black pepper (56.3 g)
2 tbsp paprika (14.4 g)                                    2/3 cup paprika (72 g)
2 tbsp corn syrup solids (27.6 g)                    2/3 cup corn syrup solids (138 g)
1 cup non-fat dry milk (94.6 g)*                      5 cups non-fat dry milk (473 g)*
1 cup ice cold water (236 ml)                          5 cups ice cold water (1.1 L)
22-24mm prepared sheep casing (or 21mm smoked collagen casing)

1.  Chill beef/fat to 34°F (1°C), grind one time through a 3/16” (5mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground beef/fat with remaining ingredients; mix well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Stuff freshly mixed batter into  sheep or collagen casings; twist into 18” (46 cm) links, refrigerate overnight to cure.
4.  Next day, hang sticks in a preheated 130°F (54°C) smoker with dampers wide open; hold for one hour.

5.  Add wood chips, close vents, gradually raise temp to 170°F (77°C). Hold till internal temp of sticks is 152°F (67°C).*

6.  Remove 152°F (67°C) snack sticks from smoker, shower with cold water until internal temp drops to 110°F (43°C).

7.  Hang snack sticks at room temperature for 1 hour to bloom (see page 159-160).
8.  Refrigerate up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.

You can skip the shower altogether and allow the snack sticks to cool at room temperature for about an hour. This will produce the shriveled appearance symbolic with store-bought smoked sausage sticks.

Hunters may use lean venison trim in place of the beef chuck to produce first-rate slimm-jimmy sticks. Use 85% lean venison trim to 15% beef fat.

*You may use soy-protein concentrate in place of non-fat dry milk.

Honey Barbecue Jerky

Although an army of barbecue sauces has been used to flavor all manner of chicken, burgers, and ribs for ages, it’s only been within the last few years that these tasty sauces have been used as jerky marinades. The results have been phenomenal. The following honey barbecue jerky recipe is a testament to that––delicious!

1 lb.                                                                 5 lbs

1 lb lean beef or venison (454 g)                    5 lbs lean beef or venison (2.27 kg)
1 1/2 tsp pickling salt (9.75 g)                        2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.8 g)
1/4 tsp Prague Powder #1 (1.4 g)                   1 1/4 tsp Prague Powder #1 (7.0 g)
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (0.55 g)                    1 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (2.75 g)
1/2 tsp garlic powder (1.55 g)                        2 1/2 tsp garlic powder (7.75 g)
1/2 tsp dry mustard powder (1.15 g)              2 1/2 tsp dry mustard powder (5.75 g)
3/4 tbsp soy sauce (11.3 ml)                           3 3/4 tbsp soy sauce (56.3 ml)
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar (15 ml)                 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar (75 ml)
1/4 cup brown sugar (57.9 g)                         1 1/4 cup brown sugar (290 g)
1/4 cup ketchup (60 g)                                   1 1/4 cups ketchup (300 g)
1/4 cup honey (84.3 g)                                   1 1/4 cups honey (422 g)

1.  Cut away all visible fat and connective tissue from the beef or venison.
2.  Chill meat to 31°F (-0.55°C), slice into 1/4” (0.64 cm) thick strips, cut across the grain for a tender bite or with the

     grain for a chewy bite.
3.  Combine remaining ingredients in a glass bowl or tub; mix well. Add meat strips, cover, refrigerate/cure overnight.
4.  Next day, arrange meat strips on oiled racks or screens in a single layer, leaving enough space to allow air flow.
5.  Dry meat strips at 145°F (63°C) in your usual manner until meat is dried to 40-50% of its original/green weight.    
6.  To test for doneness, remove one piece of jerky from drying device and allow it to cool slightly.

7.  Bend the test piece into the shape of a horseshoe. If it cracks but doesn’t break, it’s dry enough and ready to eat.
8.  Properly dried jerky should keep 2 weeks in a sealed container or you can vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.  

Depending on meat thickness and the drying method, whole-muscle jerky can take 6-12 hours to dry. Expect a 50% loss from start to finish.    
    
If you dry jerky in an oven or a dehydrator but you prefer a smoked effect, simply add liquid smoke to the marinade at the rate of 1/2 to 1 teaspoon for each 5 pounds of meat or follow the manufactures instructions.

Peppered Deer Jerky

Being a devoted fan of the hit series “Walking Dead” on AMC, I am fully aware that we could face a zombie apocalypse in the very near future, so I think that having an ample reserve of homemade jerky on hand at all times may be a good thing. This tasty, lightweight, protein-packed, snack food could prove to be a lifesaver as we scramble to put distance between ourselves and hordes of crazed zombies.

1 lb.                                                                5 lbs.

1 lb lean beef or venison (454 g)                   5 lbs lean beef or venison (2.27 kg)
1 1/2 tsp pickling salt (9.75 g)                        2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.8 g)
1/4 tsp Prague Powder #1 (1.4 g)                  1 1/4 tsp Prague Powder #1 (7.0 g)
1/2 tsp cardamom (1.4 g)                               2 1/2 tsp cardamom (7.0 g)
1/2 tsp coriander, ground (0.85 g)                 2 1/2 tsp coriander, ground (4.25 g)
1/2 tsp garlic granules (1.7 g)                        2 1/2 tsp garlic granules (8.5 g)
1/2 tsp onion powder (1.8 g)                         2 1/2 tsp onion powder (9.0 g)
1 tbsp hickory smoke powder (5.0 g)            1/3 cup hickory smoke powder (25 g)
2 1/2 tsp ground black pepper (6.25 g)        1/4 cup ground black pepper (31.3 g)
2 tbsp corn syrup solids (27.6 g)                    2/3 cup corn syrup solids (138 g)
1/2 cup ice cold water (118 ml)                      2 1/2 cups ice cold water (590 ml)

1.  Cut away all visible fat and connective tissue from the beef or venison.
2.  Chill meat to 31°F (-0.55°C), slice into 1/4” (0.64 cm) thick strips, cut across the grain for a tender bite or with the

     grain for a chewy bite.

3.  Combine remaining ingredients in a glass bowl or tub; mix well. Add meat strips, cover, refrigerate/cure overnight.
4.  Next day, arrange meat strips on oiled racks or screens in a single layer, leaving enough space to allow air flow.
5.  Dry meat strips at 145°F (63°C) in your usual manner until meat is dried to 40-50% of its original/green weight.    
6.  To test for doneness, remove one piece of jerky from drying device and allow it to cool slightly.

7.  Bend the test piece into the shape of a horseshoe. If it cracks but doesn’t break, it’s dry enough and ready to eat.
8.  Properly dried jerky should keep 2 weeks in a sealed container or you can vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months


Because of the possibility of microorganism contamination, do not reuse the marinade once the venison or beef has been removed. Be safe and discard marinade.

Although pink curing salt #1 isn’t required in the production of homemade jerky, it is recommended because it inhibits the growth of  pathogenic bacteria, reduces  spoilage and improves the color and flavor of the product.

If you dry jerky in an oven or a dehydrator but you prefer a smoked effect, simply add liquid smoke to the marinade at the rate of 1/2 to 1 teaspoon for each 5 pounds of meat or follow the manufactures instructions.

Beef Brisket Bacon

Jeremiah Cutlip is known for his resourcefulness on the grill and in the kitchen. When he sampled our beef bacon at a recent breakfast get together, he was eager to make his own.  So “Jay Stone” here is the formula I promised. The most difficult part of the whole process is waiting for the bacon to cure.

5 lbs.                                                               25 lbs.

5 lbs beef brisket (2.27 kg)                             25 lbs beef brisket (11.35 kg)
1 1/2 tbsp liquid smoke (22.5 ml)                   1/2 cup liquid smoke (113 ml)    
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)                      5 tsp Prague Powder #1 (28 .5 g)
1/3 cup pickling salt (102 g)                           1 2/3 cups pickling salt (512 g)
1/2 cup molasses (168 g)                                2 1/2 cups molasses (420 g)
1 1/2 cups dark brown sugar (348 g)              7 1/2 cups dark brown sugar (1.76 kg)  
bacon hanger*

1.  Trim fat on bottom side of brisket to 1/4” (0.65 cm) thick, place in shallow container, paint surface of brisket

     liquid smoke.
2.  Mix together Prague Powder #1, pickling salt, molasses and brown sugar, rub mixture into top, bottom, sides and

     ends of the brisket.
3.  Transfer brisket to Ziploc freezer bag, seal bag, cure at 38°F (3°C) for 7 days, turning brisket bacon every day.
4.  Remove brisket from Ziploc bag, rinse away excess cure with cold water.
5.  Hang brisket in 110°F (43°C) smoker, vents wide open, hold (no smoke) until surface of brisket is dry to the touch.
6.  Close dampers to 1/4 open, raise smoker temp to 130°F (54°C), smoke 2-3 hours or until desired color is reached.
7.  Increase smoker temperature to 170°F (77°C), hold until brisket bacon reaches internal temperature of 125°F (52°C).
8.  Remove finished bacon from smoker refrigerate overnight. Next day slice brisket bacon and *cook in usual manner.
9.  Beef bacon can be stored safely at 38-40°F (3-4°C) up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.

*Though bacon has been cured and smoked, it must be fully cooked before it can be eaten. Since there’s really no way to determine the temperature of meat sliced as thin as bacon, it should be cooked until it’s crispy.

If the finished product seems too salty for your taste buds, soaking it in cold water for one hour will remove much of the excess salt. Pat dry before slicing.

*Stainless steel bacon hangers are available at online sausage and jerky supply stores - you’ll get a lifetime of  use.

German Bologna or Baloney

f you’re having a tough time making ends meet during this economic downturn, here’s a homemade sausage recipe that will help you lower the costs of the average midday meal. And because you made it yourself, you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that your family is eating the best––even when times are the “wurst”.

5 lbs.                                                               25 lbs.

3 lbs beef chuck (1.36 kg)                              15 lbs beef chuck (6.80 kg)
1 1/2 lbs pork butt (680 g)                             7 1/2 lbs pork butt (3.4 kg)
1/2 lb pork back fat (227 g)                           2 1/2 lbs pork back fat (1.13 kg)
2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.7 g)                     3/4 cup pickling salt (244 g)
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)                     5 tsp Prague Powder #1 (28.5 g)
1/2 tsp celery seed, ground (1.35 g)             2 1/2 tsp celery seed, ground (6.75 g)
1 tsp mace, ground (2.6 g)                            5 tsp mace, ground (13 g)
1 1/2 tsp onion powder (5.4 g)                      2 1/2 tbsp onion powder (27 g)
1 tbsp white pepper (8.1 g)                           1/3 cup white pepper (40.5 g)
2 tbsp corn syrup solids (27.6 g)                    2/3 cup corn syrup solids (138 g)
2 tbsp powdered dextrose (17.4 g)               2/3 cup powdered dextrose (87 g)
3 1/4 tbsp paprika (23.4 g)                            1 cup paprika (117 g)
1 cup non-fat dry milk (94.6 g)                      5 cups non-fat dry milk (473 g)
1 cup ice cold water (236 ml)                        5 cups ice cold water (1.1 L)
3 7/8” (100mm) fibrous casing

1.  Chill meat/fat to 31°F (-0.55°C), grind two times through 1/8” (3mm) plate.
2.  Combine ground meat/fat with the remaining ingredients; mix well until the mixture is sticky and batter like.
3.  Stuff freshly mixed sausage batter into fibrous casings, refrigerate overnight to cure.
4.  Next day, hang bologna chubs in 130°F (54°C) smoker with dampers wide open; hold for one hour.
5.  Add chips, close vents, gradually raise smoker temp to 170°F (77°C). Hold until bologna is 152°F (67°C) internally.
6.  Upon reaching 152°F (67°C), remove from smoker shower with cold water until internal temperature is 110°F (43°C).
7.  Hang German bologna at room temperature for 1 hour to bloom.
8.  Refrigerate sausage up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.

Reduce the cooking time by removing the product from the smokehouse when it reaches an internal temperature of 120°F (49°C). Submerge in a 170°F (77°C) hot water bath until the internal temperature of the product is 152°F (67°C).   Do not allow the water to get hotter than 170°F (77°C).  

 

The USDA suggests cooking sausage to an internal temperature of 160°F (71°C).  

Hunters may use venison in place of the beef chuck to produce an excellent German bologna. Use 75-80% venison to 25-20% beef fat.