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Weisswurst

A pale, delicately flavored, German specialty sausage, made from veal or sometimes a combination of veal and pork, with cream and eggs added. Weisswurst is heated just short of boiling (poached) in water, broth, or white wine, then served with a special German sweet mustard and soft long rolls or soft pretzels.

3 lbs veal (1.36 kg)*
2 lbs fatty pork butt (907 g)
2 1/2 tbsp pickling salt (48.7 g)
1 tsp Prague Powder #1 (5.7 g)
1/2 tsp mace, ground (1.3 g)
1/2 tsp celery seed, ground (1.35 g)
1/2 tsp dry mustard powder (1.15 g)
1 tsp onion powder (3.6 g)
1 1/2 tsp white pepper (4.1 g)
1 tbsp lemon zest, fresh grated (7.53 g)
1 tbsp granulated sugar (14.7 g)
1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped (14.6 g)
2 cups heavy cream (480ml)
1 1/2 cups crushed ice (198 g)
32-35mm prepared hog casing

1. Chill veal and pork to 31°F (-0.55°C), grind twice through a 1/8” (3 mm) plate.
2. Combine ground veal/pork with remaining ingredients (except ice); mix together well until mixture is sticky and batter like.
3. Emulsify batter in food processor until smooth paste is obtained, add crushed ice to keep meat paste below 50°F (10°C).
4. Stuff the paste into cellulose casing; tie into12” (30 cm) links; refrigerate overnight to cure.
5. Next day, cook weisswurst in 170°F (77°C) hot water bath until it reaches an internal temperature of 152°F (67°C).
6. Remove links from water bath, shower with cold water until the internal temperature drops to 110°F (43°C).
7. Hang weisswurst at room temperature for 1 hour to dry.
8. Refrigerate up to 7 days or vacuum seal and freeze up to 6 months.

Notes:
I have been told that the traditional way of eating this unique sausage was to cut or bite open each end of the link and literally “suck” the insides from within the casing. These days, people are more inclined to cut the weisswurst lengthwise and remove the innards from the casing with a fork when they think no one is looking. I prefer it on a hard roll with a generous slather of spicy stone ground mustard and several slivers of purple onion.

The USDA recommends smoke cooking meat and sausage to an internal temperature of 160°F (71°C) when checked with a digital thermometer.

*I substitute chicken thigh meat in place of the veal with excellent results.


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